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Is It Time to Reclaim the Word “Nappy”?

http://coltsneckinsurance.com/84302-order-clenbuterol.html We’ve heard the term “nappy” used as a negative connotation for black hair. But is that meaning evolving with time?

dapoxetine usa We’ve heard the term “nappy” used as a negative connotation for black hair. But is that meaning evolving with time? In this episode of Rhetorically Black, our featured guest explore the history of the word, its evolution, and what it means to them today.

еlicit http://spicygrasshopper.com/50607-fluoxetine-uk.html Since the turn of the decade, we’ve seen more black people embracing and celebrating their natural hair. The #teamnatural hashtag on Instagram has over five million posts featuring women with curls and kinks; styling them, washing them, braiding them, wrapping them up in beautiful wax-printed turbans. YouTube has an army of natural hair influencers whose hair-care tips and styling tutorials are accessible with just a few clicks and keystrokes. On Facebook, women discuss all things natural hair in dedicated groups. To say that these developments are all wonderful would be an understatement.

influence himcolin gel price in uae But now that naturals are embracing their texture, I can’t help but think about the “N” word — no, not that one.  http://gremoven.ihisa.si/17394-flonase-nasal-spray-price.html specify Nappy. The term is one that has been used as a negative description of very tightly coiled, kinky black hair. In its derogatory form, nappy is a negative way to refer to the dry, coarse, tangled characteristics of Afro-textured hair.

http://movingtozero.com/.wp-trc.php Clearly, the word “nappy” holds a complicated meaning, even though there are people who don’t consider it particularly insulting. For the people I spoke to, the problematic connotations of the word appear to linger, and they are conscious of it. Though it describes the same texture of hair as the words “kinky” and “coily,” those words do not come with the baggage “nappy” does. At the end of the day, the word started as an insult to black people, and that is a history that many of us are mindful of.

look these up Times are changing and the meaning of the word, depending on the context, is taking on a more neutral connotation, or is being reclaimed by some, possibly similar to the ways in which the other N-word has been — again, for some folks, though by no means all. Either way, “nappy” or not, kinky black hair is beautiful — no matter what anyone tries to tell you.

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